lady amherst pheasant hen

The female (hen) is much less showy, with a duller mottled brown plumage all over, similar to that of the female Common Pheasant but with finer barring. The Lady Amherst’s pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae), found in Southwestern China and Northern Burma, is an ornamental bird commonly found in the collections of many aviculture enthusiasts across the United States.It is considered a ruffed pheasant, since the males sport an elaborate ruff which is utilized during the courtship displays. The long grey tail and rump is red, blue, dark green, white and yellow plumage. The genus name is from Ancient Greek khrusolophos, "with golden crest". She is very like the female Golden Pheasant, but has a darker head and cleaner underparts than the hen of that species. View attachment 1872390 1 day old male Golden pheasant, wattle present. Habitat: Forests, particularly bamboo thickets. Whilst they can fly, they prefer to run, but if startled they can suddenly burst upwards at great speed, with a distinctive wing sound. See more ideas about pheasant, amherst, birds. Lady Amherst Pheasants The Lady Amherst's pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) is a bird of the order Galliformes and the family Phasianidae. Lady Amherst Standards Lady Amherst first introduced the ornamental pheasant on her estates, near the Duke of Bedford's Woburn Abbey, where the birds were also shot for game and interbred. They feed on the ground on grain, leaves and invertebrates, but roost in trees at night. It is unmistakable with its nuchal cape white black, with a red crest. The "cape" can be raised in display. Consequently, little is known of their behaviour in the wild. The bill is horn-coloured and they had blue-gray legs.[4]. The English name and amherstiae commemorates Sarah Amherst, who was responsible for sending the first specimen of the bird to London in 1828. in length, its tail accounting for 80 cm (31 in) of the total length. View attachment 1872391 1 day old female Golden pheasant, no wattle present. The male has a gruff call in the breeding season. [2], The species is native to southwestern China and far northern Myanmar, but has been introduced elsewhere. Range: Southwestern China and Myanmar (Burma), possibly Tibet, and there is a declining, feral population in Britain. She is very like the female Golden Pheasant, but has a darker head and cleaner underparts than the hen of that species. The "cape" can be raised in display. The English name and amherstiae commemorates Sarah Amherst, who was responsible for sending the first specimen of the bird to London in 1828. In a pure Lady Amherst's pheasant, the red crest would begin well back on the head, not at the beak, and the belly would have no red. Lady Amherst's pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) is a bird of the order Galliformes and the family Phasianidae. She is very like the female golden pheasant, but has a darker head and cleaner underparts than the hen of that species. Despite the male's showy appearance, these birds are very difficult to see in their natural habitat, which is dense, dark forests with thick undergrowth. View attachment 1872392 Lady Amherst first introduced the ornamental pheasant on her estates, near the Duke of Bedford's Woburn Abbey, where they were also shot for game and the introduced populations in England will interbreed. This species is closely related to the golden pheasant (C. pictus), but has a yellow eye, blue-green bare skin around it. In 2020 a young male was reportedly spotted in Stourbridge, West Midlands, The adult male is 100–120 cm (40-48 in.) The species is native to south-western China and Burma, but has been introduced elsewhere, and has established a self-supporting, but now declining, feral population in England, the stronghold of which was in West Bedfordshire. The female is much less showy, with a duller mottled brown plumage all over, similar to that of the female common pheasant (P. colchicus) but with finer barring. The genus name is from Ancient Greek khrusolophos, "with golden crest". Widespread throughout its large range, Lady Amherst's pheasant is evaluated as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Previously, a self-supporting feral population was established in England, the stronghold of which was in West Bedfordshire. The female (hen) - featured below - is much less showy, with a duller mottled brown plumage all over, similar to that of the female Common Pheasant but with finer barring.

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